Donald Trump is the next president of the United States. While voter turnout was lower than it has been since 2000 election, it appears that white Evangelical voters were among the strongest constituencies to propel Trump to victory. In other words, my people, the group I associate with, helped place Trump in office. I woke up to the news that Trump was elected this morning and have been reflecting both on his victory and the path that placed him next in line for the White House, and what that means for us as Christians, now. I was not a Trump supporter, and was grieved because I thought both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were troubling options for our country, and the data that is coming out reveals a populace that also does not find President-Elect Trump very appealing (his unfavorable rating is above 50%). This indicates that, likely, most who cast a vote for him did so in response to his opponent, Secretary Clinton, rather than because of a deep belief in his candidacy. In other words, they were more fearful of a Clinton Presidency, with her lack of trustworthiness, her radical opposition to the pro-life movement, her opposition to a biblical sexual ethic, and other issues than they were fearful of a Trump presidency. I share their concern about Mrs. Clinton, personally, and could not vote for her. However, the populace voting for a candidate out of concern for their opposition leaves followers of Christ in an important position this morning.

There is a chance that many who voted for Donald Trump out of concern over Hillary Clinton will now sit back and relax, to a degree, thinking that they have experienced victory. This would be a mistake, particularly for those of us who make up the church. Now that one great concern (Mrs. Clinton) is no longer a threat, the Christian’s new responsibility is to recognize that the candidate who has been elected is a man who has personally embodied a liberal sexual ethic, a grossly negligent and even dismissive attitude toward women, minorities, immigrants and others and who shows little awareness of a Christian commitment. As followers of Jesus, we need to pray for and honor him as president, but we need to hold President-Elect Trump accountable to not only defeat a concerning political foe, but also hold him accountable to embrace a Christian ethic on issues such as life, the dignity of every person regardless of race or gender, and so on.

The American people have spoken and Donald Trump will soon be president. We should pray for him and honor him as our President, as scripture calls us to. We should rest comfortably in the fact that God is in control, and his sovereignty is not in question (as he would have been should Mrs. Clinton have won). We must also, however, speak prophetically to him and his government, holding him accountable to govern in a way that is consistent with a Christian ethic. We cannot afford to relax, believing the work is done when there is much at stake. We also cannot pretend that a man who self-identifies as a Conservative will necessarily insure a preferred future. In other words, now that the election is over, the work of the church is not done, it is just beginning.

So let us speak out with kindness and with grace. Let us call our government to a pro-life, pro-family, pro-women, pro-minority, pro-immigrant, pro-Constitution governance. And let us not take hope in any earthly government, regardless of political persuasion, remembering that our ultimate hope is in King Jesus.

Micah is a husband to Tracy & a daddy to Grace, Kessed & Haddon. He’s Senior Pastor at Brainerd Baptist Church in Chattanooga, TN. Most of all, he’s a debtor to grace.

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